Video: Chinese woman with voracious appetite stuffs meal for ten

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Photo: Ms Hu's Weibo account

25 -year-old Ms Hu Tongtong, a famous broadcaster on Weibo, a popular social media platform in China, stuns the crowd by having a bottomless stomach.

The 43.5kg, nicknamed “big stomach”, was born in Heilongjiang, China. Her single consumption consists of 93 eggs, 200 dumplings, 76 egg tarts, 5kg of hamburgers and 48 lamb kebabs.

Photo: Ms Hu’s Weibo account

At one of the eating challenges she took part in, she beat her four other rivals by simply gulping down 17 bowls of noodles in 10 minutes, while her rivals actually struggled to finish less than seven bowls.

“I can eat a lot normally. Since I also need to have so much food, why not show it online?” Ms Hu told the South China Morning Post. She said her goal was to let more people share the joy of delicious food.

“I think my stomach has been expanded little by little,” she said. “I remember when I was a primary school pupil, I could eat four packs of instant noodles a time. Each pack is 90 grams.”

Her food consumption for each meal approximately matched that of 9-10 adults. Her parents are accustomed to her bizarre appetite.

“Food broadcast” has become a thing in recent years, especially after videos of “Korean spicy noodle challenge” had gone viral on the Internet. The hosts typically convey how tasty or spicy the food is to the audience with exaggerated expressions and gestures in the videos.

Watch the video to feel the joy of eating:

Small person, huge appetite: the 'Big Stomach' internet stars …

Meet one of China's popular "big stomach" broadcasters. At an eating competition in May, she easily devoured 17 bowls of noodles in 10 minutes.

Posted by South China Morning Post on Friday, 3 November 2017

One netizen wrote on Weibo, “Watching Tongtong’s video makes me feel hungry even though I have just eaten.”

“What do these people’s stomachs look like? It’s beyond my imagination!” another netizen expressed.

Ms Hu works at her parents’ cosmetics company in Tianjin, and only does broadcasts as a hobby. She earns up to 20,000 yuan (S$4,000) a month, which can barely cover her food costs.

“My video is only meant to share good food, and I feel satisfied when people support me.”

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